How to be kind to hung over people

Wish you a very happy new year! May all your dreams come true this year!

Wish we all show more kindness to each other this year. I received exactly one email from a dear reader – Aarthi about my kindness challenge who rightly pointed out that people might not be comfortable sharing their stories of kindness, in blowing their own trumpet. She also suggested that it might be easier instead to share stories of kindness that they have experienced from others. I think that’s a great idea too. I am still open to highlighting stories of kindness in this space, whether given or experienced. So please feel free to share your stories with me; you can mail me at Jayanthi.padmanabhan@gmail.com.

hung over clipart

In the meantime until the kindness stories start pouring in, I thought I’d pepper the series with a “How to be kind to x” post each week. This week it is all about being kind to hung over people. Let’s jump right in:

How to be kind to hung over people

  1. Hung over people are in a bad state. They’re already regretting the previous night. Harder than being hung over is pretending not to be. So please make it a little easier and save the sermon for later. 
    • If you’re the spouse, parent, child or sibling please wait for the next day to say anything.
    • If you’re anybody else, it’s not your business. Avoid judging them by way of innocent sounding questions about their family, kids, drinking habits and such. You need not approve of any of those.
    • If the hungover person is a woman, avoid snide remarks trying to shame her. It is still not your business. Avoid judging her by way of innocent sounding questions about her family, kids, drinking habits and such. You need not approve of any of those.
  2. Draw the blinds. Provide some food, a big jug of water, a combiflam or the preferred tablet for headache and let them sleep in. Give them their sunglasses if they find it too bright when moving around the house.
  3. If possible, cover for them. Try to take care of their chores or commitments for the day.
  4. Lend a patient ear if they want to explain or talk about the previous day. Hear completely and try not to say what you would have done in the situation.
  5. When they’ve recovered, objectively list out your problems, your expectations and a working plan for the future. Don’t expect to agree on everything. Your goal should not be to change the person because nobody can change anybody. Your goal should only be to see how comfortable you can make it for yourself. 

Please share your tips on how best to be kind to hung over people. I’d love to hear.

Let me know who else needs a dose of kindness and I’ll try to cover them in this series. Stay happy and stay kind!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply