Sprouts dosai, crispy, delicious dosai that is healthy too

Sprouts Dosai | Tastiest breakfast that includes sprouts

I want to share a spectacularly easy and delicious Sprouts Dosai recipe with you but I want to tell you a little story first.  Story I was cycling away at the gym. A mobile phone rang somewhere nearby. The person next to me on another cycle picked up one of his two mobiles. It was one of those large screen LED TV type mobiles and there was a bright flash of light which even I with my poor eyesight could see quite clearly. A woman’s photo flashed on the screen. I turned away because I am decent and well-mannered and I don’t peep into people’s mobiles. He spoke for a couple of minutes which I did not listen to. I happened to turn that way when he hung up, the light caught my eye and I saw “Wife Darling” in big bold letters on his phone. Now I didn’t know which way to look. I looked at others who were very seriously going about their workout uncaring of what I had witnessed. I had to say this to somebody. So I am writing it on my blog. I’ve also seen a few men who stored their wife’s number as “My Wife”. This particular Parthiban and Vadivelu scene comes to mind. Why the “My”? It’s not like you have the numbers of all the wifes in your apartment – “ABlock 19 Wife”, “B34 Wife”, “Carparking fighter’s wife”… I tried to understand the characters who’ll store their wife’s number as “Wife Darling”, “My Wife”, “Wife Chellakutti” and so on. I know we store our mom or dad’s number as mom/amma, dad/appa because that’s how we call them. But “Wife Darling”?! I tried to list down the kinds of people who’ll do that: New to marriage Is the expressive kind of person who’ll write long posts on facebook praising his wife for cooking for him and having his socks sorted. Is the kind of guy who likes to be “mothered” (smothered), the one whose wife calls him 20 times a day, tells him what to wear, what to eat, answers for him and accompanies him everywhere he goes. This is the kind of guy who’ll willingly hand over his phone to the wife who’ll read his whatsapp messages, change his picture and then name herself “wife darling”. This could be the person who forwards exclusively “nagging-wife” kind of un-funny jokes to all whatsapp...

Chettinad Kathirikkai (eggplant) gravy

After an un-inspiring week of idli sambar, dosa sambar and rice sambar potato thokku at home and then a nice languid trip to Pondicherry, beautiful vanilla crepes, gratins and curries later I am still blank and clueless. The vegetable basket in the fridge is near empty. I’ve not stood staring at stuff in a grocery store in weeks. The stash of fresh rosemary and dill I lovingly bought are dried, wilted and frozen for eternity in my freezer. The last my oven saw any activity were some nice crispy Parmesan biscuits weeks back. The oven has been having a holiday ever since. But I’ve been hoarding bowls, plates and cups like a mad woman. I can’t think beyond tiffin sambar for idli, potato fry and sambar. I’ve got into the dangerous home cook rut. It is scary. I turned to my cookbooks for help, for inspiration, for solace. I found this Kathirikkai gravy in the “Chettinad cookbook”. I found joy. I found one more side dish for dosai. I found a sustainable alternative to sambar. I made this curry in 15 minutes flat when Hasini and Yuvi were clamouring for their breakfast on a Saturday morning. It was very late in the morning (too late to mention). We had taken our time with the weekly “yennai and thalai-kulial” (oil massage and hair-wash). I had Pogo on to distract them while I got the gravy underway, but the commercial breaks are so much longer and the kids come running again. I heave the dosa kal (tawa) on to the stove while the Kathirikkai gravy simmers beside it, the aroma already wafting up from the kadai. While the dosa kal heats up, I try to engage little Yuvi in some conversation “Cone dosai” or “Round dosai” or “Kutti dosai”. Yuvi: “Yedha kuda ippo” (Give something now) I pour some dosa batter on the tawa and furiously spread it out in fast concentric circles to make a crisp dosa, drizzle some oil and then check the gravy, nearly done. I ladle hot chettinad kathirikkai gravy beside each dosa and bring it out to my cartoon watching, by now furious patrons. Hasini declared “I don’t want kathirikkai”. I cajole, threaten, lie and coax her to taste the gravy. She does. She asks for a second helping. Prep time: 5 mins Cooking time: 15-20 mins Serves: 5 Ingredients Kathirikkai/Eggplants/purple brinjals – ¼ kilo cut into...

Peanut/Groundnut chutney – Versatile chutney

I am going to rave about peanut chutney the way people rave about peanut butter. Really, peanut chutney is such a brilliant, peanuttty chutney, it smacks of peanuts. Peanut lovers will love it. I served the peanut chutney with hot, crisp dosais.  Peanut chutney is also a great accompaniment to idli, upma or adai. With a tasty chutney I can down idli/dosai even though we had the same idli/dosai for yesterday’s dinner and possibly yesterday’s breakfast as well. You know the idli/dosai legacy of my family. I love chutneys, not so much sambar. My sister prefers sambar over chutneys. I think these are two fundamentally different people – the chutney lovers and Sambar preferers. Like the sweet lovers and sweet non-lovers. I cannot bring myself to call anyone a sweet hater, so I am calling them a sweet non-lover. I am a sweet loving maniac (I ate one Cadbury bar a day every day during my pregnancy) with a family history of diabetes and a family of irresponsible diabetics and I just don’t understand sweet non-lovers.     I can imagine this peanut chutney making a really good spread for spicy sandwiches instead of the usual green chutney. I think this peanut chutney will be a delightful change but you’d have to pair it appropriately – maybe peanut chutney flavoured spicy chicken sandwich or peanut chutney seasoned fresh cut veggie sandwich. Preparation time: 10 minsCooking time: 7 minsServes: 4 Ingredients Peanuts/Groundnuts – 3/4 cupCoconut – half a medium coconut gratedDry red chillies (long ones) – 4-5Salt to tasteOil – 1 tbsp Tempering Mustard seeds – 1 tspSplit black gram dal/ulatham paruppu – 1 tspCurry leaves – 1 stemOil – 1 tsp Method 1.      Dry roast the peanuts in a kadai/skillet for 5-8 minutes on a low flame till they colour. Be careful not to burn them. Remove from kadai. When they’re warm enough to handle, rub the peanuts between your palms to remove the brown skin. It should fall off easily now that they’re roasted. 2.      Add 1 tbsp oil to the same kadai, drop in the dry red chillies and fry for a few seconds. Then add the grated coconut and the peanuts and fry for 2-3 minutes till the peanuts are slightly browned. 3.      Transfer the roasted peanut mixture to a mixer grinder, add salt and water and grind to a smooth chutney consistency. 4.      Add 1 tsp oil to the...

Poached Egg Korma

Poached Egg Korma Poached Egg Korma Every family has its Sunday morning ritual. At my mom’s place, it was more of a Sunday afternoon ritual for me and my sister as we rarely ever managed to wake up in the am. We always had rice, paruppu (dal), rasam and fried eggs. This has been my dad’s Sunday brunch for as long as I can remember and we just followed suit. In my husband’s place, it is dosai and poached egg korma. There is something very comforting about these familiar rituals. This is especially true when I am away from home. I start craving the familiarity, the usual tedium. Go on any holiday and I’d start missing our giant-size triple bed (a double bed plus a single bed to accommodate the 4 of us), the bathroom bucket (I am not a shower person/tub person, I am a native Indian (Tamil) and I want my bucket and mug – what is it with five star hotels and buckets?), my cupboard (however messy it is) and idli/dosai!! At home it is unimaginable that I can miss idli/dosai, after all this is what we have every day. Even Murugan idli kadai may be closed on some days but not our idli kadai at home. It functions 24/7 365 days. Once our wet grinder broke down and we thought we may have to go through a day without idli but then we borrowed our neighbour’s grinder to make the idli batter and saved the day. How about that?   So this here is our Sunday morning ritual, Dosai and Poached egg korma. The korma is fresh, simple and beautifully balanced and makes for a hearty breakfast with idli, dosai or chappathi. What’s your Sunday morning ritual? Preparation time: 10 minsCooking time:20 minsServes: 5 Ingredients Eggs – 5Coconut milk extracted from 1 coconutOnions – 2 finely choppedTomatoes – 2 finely choppedFennel seeds – 1 tspCinnamon – 1 inch stickChilli – 1 slit lengthwiseCurry leaves – 1 stemChilli Powder – 3 tbspTurmeric – ½ tspOil – 2 tspSalt to tasteCoriander leaves – handful, chopped for garnishing Method 1.      Heat oil in a kadai and when hot add fennel seeds followed by the cinnamon stick. Add chopped onions and fry till translucent. Add chopped tomatoes and sauté for 2-3 minutes. 2.      When the tomatoes are cooked through, add chilli powder, turmeric powder and half a cup of water...

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