The trick to making the creamiest, just tangy enough Curd rice

Now as soon as I say that the recipe I am going to share today is Curd rice, I can imagine Maamiyaars and Gayathris in families (gossip-specialists & critics in families) turning up their noses. They’d compare me with their daughter, themselves, their maid or that horrible character in the TV serial (Indian TV serials have only 2 types of characters – saccharine good & perfect or deviously bad & empty) and profile me as the lazy woman who makes a big deal of a simple curd rice.

Curd rice

I believe every dish, however simple can be exquisite or bleh. A fried egg is simple. It can also be the most beautiful thing – lacy slightly browned edges, soft set whites holding a jiggly yolk with a smattering of freshly ground pepper. Or it could be something else.

I also do not believe the single recipe dish. There are always numerous ways to make a dish. I am always on the lookout to make a dish better, to put a different twist on it, to make it easier or quicker.

My complaint with curd rice was always that it was either too runny or too thick and lumpy. It did not stay the way it was packed. By lunch time, it would have transformed into something else. Sometimes the curd rice turned too sour. If I tried to control the tang by adding too little curd, it tasted too flat. The rice had to be soft too – not pureed in a mixie, baby food kind of mash but pongal kind of creamy soft.

Curd rice

The one trick I am going to share today will solve all your curd rice problems, I promise.

Cook rice in a pot of water till it is cooked through and the rice grains are full length. Then add milk and cook the rice in milk until creamy and soft and pongal like. This step makes all the difference. Cooking the rice in milk ensures that the rice remains creamy, luscious and soft. The milk also offsets the tang in the curd brilliantly to make it just as tangy enough as you want it. Towards the end when you’re tasting and adjusting the seasoning, feel free to add in a spoon of curd or milk to achieve your right amount of tang. There is no right or wrong here. Since the rice has already absorbed a lot of moisture while being cooked, this curd rice will not get thick and lumpy as it sits. It will stay just as creamy and light at lunch time as when you made it in the morning. So don’t add too much liquid while adjusting thinking it will get thicker as it sits. This curd rice won’t. How you make it is how it’ll stay.

Curd rice

There are lots of ways to serve this curd rice. I love to fold in chopped raw mangoes and serve alongside a bright thokku. Here I served it alongside a simple double beans & butter beans thokku. There are so many other ways to serve this.

Curd rice

Classic – Curd rice with Maavadu and lots of the maavadu juice

Anytime favourite – Curd rice with any sharp pickle – Aavakkai or Lemon pickle

Dinner Party – Ladle the curd rice into a large borosil bowl and dot with pomegranate arils or seedless green grapes

Lunch box – Curd rice with a bright veggie thokku

Travel – Curd rice packed with Kara potato chips

Non-vegetarian lover – Curd rice and Prawn Thokku

I would love to eat Curd rice every way I listed above. Curd rice is one of my favourite comfort foods. It feels good all over, as if I’ve done something good for my body – drunk green tea, went for a walk and did surya namaskars. I would have only eaten a bowl full of curd rice. Somehow I’ve been wired too think that curd rice is good for me. If you are a curd rive lover like me, do try this recipe. It won’t disappoint you I promise. Enjoy!

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Print Recipe
Creamy, perfect Curd rice
Creamy, luscious and light curd rice that is just tangy enough and stays that way long after you've made it. In short, the one curd rice recipe you'll ever need!
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
4 people
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
4 people
Instructions
  1. Add water to a thick bottomed pot and bring to a boil. Rinse rice in 2-3 changes of water, drain the rice and add to the boiling water. Lower heat to medium and cook until rice is cooked through and most of the water is absorbed – about 15 minutes.
  2. Now pour in the milk, stir to mix well and cook on medium-low till rice is soft and absorbs most of the milk – 15 minutes. Keep stirring from time to time to avoid the rice sticking to the bottom of the pan. The rice-milk mixture should reach a porridge like consistency and be easily mashable with the back of a spoon. At that stage, switch off, mash lightly to your desired consistency and allow the rice-milk mixture to cool down completely.
  3. Meanwhile prepare the tempering. Heat oil in a small saucepan. When oil turns hot, add mustard seeds and let splutter. Add the curry leaves, minced ginger and chopped green chillies and mix well. When the green chillies are scalded, switch off. Add the coriander leaves and mix well.
  4. 4. When the rice-milk mixture has cooled down, add salt and the tempered mixture and mix well. Whisk yogurt/curd well to remove lumps and pour into the rice mixture. Fold the yogurt into the rice mixture thoroughly. Taste and adjust seasoning. You can fold in the chopped raw mangoes at this stage or serve them on top like I have done here. Serve alongside a bright, hot thokku (I served alongside a simple double beans thokku) or avakkai oorukai (mango pickle). Dig in!
Share this Recipe

Leave a Reply